Tag Archives: skincare

Halloween Pumpkin Face Mask

The past couple of nights we’ve been gutting the pumpkins we harvested and carving them up for our Jack ‘o’ Lanterns. It’s a bit of effort but Grace loves the process. She diligently picks out the pumpkin seeds so we can roast them. What to do with all the pumpkin innards? How about a DIY Pumpkin Face Mask?

Pumpkins are full of enzymes and Vitamin A that exfoliate, soften and smooth your skin, so why not pamper your skin after the trick or treating is over. (You can slather this mixture from head to toe!)

Here’s the recipe I found via Spa magazine.

1 small pumpkin
1 cup yogurt
Juice from 1 lemon
1 Tbsp. honey
1/2 tsp. ginger (freshly grated, preferred)
1/2 tsp. cinnamon

To Make:
1. Cut the pumpkin, removing skin and scooping out pulp.  Place the flesh in a pot with a small amount of water.

2. Cook the pumpkin until mashable with a potato masher.

3. Remove from heat, mash pumpkin, and add yogurt, lemon juice, honey and spices. Use while still warm.

To Use:
1. Sit in the tub or shower and slather the warm pumpkin mixture all over your dry body and face. You may apply to your hair too, if you like.  (Make sure hair is clean.)

2. Rest with the mixture on your body for 10 minutes.

3. Rinse off with warm water.

4. Pat the skin dry and follow with an application of your favorite body and face moisturizer.  For hair after rinsing, follow with your favorite conditioner.

Enjoy and Happy Halloween!

xo,

p.s. Can’t be bothered making your own pumpkin mask? Try this ready made concoction from Sephora.

Gorgeous pumpkin photo via Shaun Ingham

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A is for Aloe

Today’s herb of the day is the African healing succulent, Aloe.

Aloe has been used for thousands of years. In fact, the great Greek historian, Dioscorides has noted its use on wounds, burns, blemishes and even as an treatment for hair loss. Apothecaries often prescribed it to be taken internally for stomach disorders, constipation, insomnia, hemorrhoids, headaches, mouth diseases and to aid kidney function.

Today, we know that Aloe is still used for some of these ailments. It’s an especially powerful ingredient to add to creams and lotions, for it’s healing properties on the skin are unrivaled. You will find it a key component to many of our products.

However, the most effective way to use aloe gel is to get it directly from the plant. Break off a leaf, slice it down the middle and apply the gel to the skin. It can do wonders for a burn or an unfortunate case of poison ivy.  So do yourself a favor and put a potted aloe in your windowsill.

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